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Crowdsourcing a Collective Sense of Place

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dc.contributor.author Jenkins, Andrew
dc.contributor.author Croitoru, Arie
dc.contributor.author Crooks, Andrew T.
dc.contributor.author Stefanidis, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-25T15:41:48Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-25T15:41:48Z
dc.date.issued 2016-04-06
dc.identifier.citation Jenkins A, Croitoru A, Crooks AT, Stefanidis A (2016) Crowdsourcing a Collective Sense of Place. PLoS ONE 11(4): e0152932. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0152932 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/10346
dc.description.abstract Place can be generally defined as a location that has been assigned meaning through human experience, and as such it is of multidisciplinary scientific interest. Up to this point place has been studied primarily within the context of social sciences as a theoretical construct. The availability of large amounts of user-generated content, e.g. in the form of social media feeds or Wikipedia contributions, allows us for the first time to computationally analyze and quantify the shared meaning of place. By aggregating references to human activities within urban spaces we can observe the emergence of unique themes that characterize different locations, thus identifying places through their discernible sociocultural signatures. In this paper we present results from a novel quantitative approach to derive such sociocultural signatures from Twitter contributions and also from corresponding Wikipedia entries. By contrasting the two we show how particular thematic characteristics of places (referred to herein as platial themes) are emerging from such crowd-contributed content, allowing us to observe the meaning that the general public, either individually or collectively, is assigning to specific locations. Our approach leverages probabilistic topic modelling, semantic association, and spatial clustering to find locations are conveying a collective sense of place. Deriving and quantifying such meaning allows us to observe how people transform a location to a place and shape its characteristics.
dc.description.sponsorship Publication of this article was funded in part by the George Mason University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund and a Provost Award. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_US
dc.subject Online encyclopedias en_US
dc.subject Twitter en_US
dc.subject Recreation en_US
dc.subject Semantics en_US
dc.subject Sports en_US
dc.subject California en_US
dc.subject Data visualization en_US
dc.subject Social media en_US
dc.title Crowdsourcing a Collective Sense of Place en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0152932


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