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Nonlinear Hemodynamic of Workload and Workload Transitions

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dc.contributor.advisor Thompson, James
dc.contributor.author McKendrick, Ryan
dc.creator McKendrick, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-28T10:20:50Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-28T10:20:50Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10415
dc.description.abstract Quantifying and classifying cognitive load (i.e. how individuals cognitively respond to the demands of a task) is important for optimal performance. How cognitive load changes over time (i.e. workload transitions) alters the perception of cognitive load and performance. Activity in prefrontal cortex has previously been associated with working memory load. Furthermore, attenuation of prefrontal activity has been linked to cognitive overload, a cognitive load state associated with failures in task performance. We hypothesized that a similar nonlinearity would be observed for cognitive underload, a cognitive load state associated with mind wandering and inefficient attention strategies. These two nonlinearities for cognitive underload and overload would manifest as a cubic function in lateral prefrontal cortex relating to working memory load. Observation of this function would allow for objective classification of different cognitive load states. These states could then be identified in individual performers and used to study the effects of workload transitions to different cognitive load states. Workload transitions were hypothesized to induce an increase in cognitive load as indexed by changes in oxygenated hemoglobin in lateral prefrontal cortex.
dc.format.extent 112 pages
dc.language.iso en
dc.rights Copyright 2016 Ryan McKendrick
dc.subject Cognitive psychology
dc.subject Neurosciences
dc.subject Cognitive Load
dc.subject Cognitive States
dc.subject fNIRS
dc.subject Working Memory
dc.title Nonlinear Hemodynamic of Workload and Workload Transitions
dc.type Dissertation
thesis.degree.level Ph.D.
thesis.degree.discipline Psychology, Human Factors/Applied Cognition Concentration
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University


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