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Do Police Go to Places with More Crime? A Spatial and Temporal Examination of Police Proactivity

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dc.contributor.advisor Lum, Cynthia
dc.contributor.author Wu, Xiaoyun
dc.creator Wu, Xiaoyun
dc.date 2015-04-28
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-10T18:20:21Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-10T18:20:21Z
dc.date.issued 2016-10-10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/10502
dc.description.abstract Over the last four decades, research has shown that police officers can reduce and prevent crime when they employ proactive, problem-solving, and place-based strategies. However, whether this research has translated into daily police activity is seldom examined. Are police being proactive when not answering calls for service? Do they target that proactivity in places that need it the most? Using calls for service data in a progressive police agency, the authors examine both the spatial and temporal relationship between proactive activity by officers and concentrations of crime using multiple methods, including Andresen’s Spatial Point Pattern Test. Results suggest that police in Jacksonville are highly proactive, place-based, and micro-scaled in allocating their resource. They spent a large proportion of their resources conducting proactive work in accordance with the spatial distribution of crime, and they specifically concentrated significant proactive resources in the most crime-ridden areas, making the relationship an increasing curvilinear one between police proactive work and crime at places. More specifically, each crime at a micro place is related to around 40 additional minutes of police proactive work there, the figure of which becomes even higher at places with high enough crime. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject police patrol en_US
dc.subject police time utilization en_US
dc.subject place-based policing en_US
dc.subject police proactive work en_US
dc.title Do Police Go to Places with More Crime? A Spatial and Temporal Examination of Police Proactivity en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts in Criminology, Law and Society en_US
thesis.degree.level Master's en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Criminology, Law and Society en_US
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en_US


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