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The United States’ History of Unsportsmanlike Conduct & and the Portrayal of Colin Kaepernick: How the Culture Surrounding Football Reinforces the White Supremacist Patriarchy & Nationalism

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dc.contributor.advisor Dennis, Rutledge
dc.contributor.author Foltz, Katelyn E
dc.creator Foltz, Katelyn E
dc.date 2020-04-07
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-30T20:40:31Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-30T20:40:31Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/11809
dc.description.abstract Colin Kaepernick spearheaded a social movement to protest police brutality and other oppression experienced by the Black community by choosing to kneel during the National Anthem before NFL games. These protests quickly became controversial and created a media firestorm. This research aims to understand how conservative media outlets framed the protests, and more specifically Colin Kaepernick, through the lenses of masculinity and whiteness, as well as attempts to understand how culture surrounding football reinforce these tropes. The analysis was based on a purposeful sampling and emergent coding of 77 opinion media pieces from Fox News Network, as well as ethnographic observations that followed a rural Virginia high school football team and interviews with 21 participants from the high school community. This study revealed how the portrayal of Colin Kaepernick is displayed through the creation of The American man, based largely in ideas of whiteness, patriotism, and subservience, challenging of The American man, and notions of crafting the American “we” through collective identity and how these portrayals are deeply rooted in the culture of American football. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject masculinity en_US
dc.subject white supremacy en_US
dc.subject nationalism en_US
dc.subject race en_US
dc.subject activism en_US
dc.title The United States’ History of Unsportsmanlike Conduct & and the Portrayal of Colin Kaepernick: How the Culture Surrounding Football Reinforces the White Supremacist Patriarchy & Nationalism en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts in Sociology en_US
thesis.degree.level Master's en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Sociology en_US
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en_US


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