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Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 101 - Fair Use and Access (Shutdown Edition)

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dc.contributor.author Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-05T20:52:07Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-05T20:52:07Z
dc.date.issued 2013-11-21
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/11835
dc.description Originally published by the Center for History and New Media through the Digital Campus podcast (http://digitalcampus.tv). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/). en_US
dc.description.abstract In this, the first episode of the new Digital Campus century, Mills, Stephen, and Amanda were joined by two new Digital History Fellows, Spencer Roberts and Anne Ladyem McDivitt. Our first story is possibly the most important in Digital Campus history: the Google Books lawsuit has ended (until the appeals). At long last, the court decided that Google’s digitizing project was within fair use law and practice, clearing the way for the digitization work to continue. In addition to the legal significance, it means we can STOP TALKING ABOUT THE GOOGLE BOOKS LAWSUIT. It’s such a shame Dan wasn’t with us to chip in his four cents on the subject. Probably because we needed a new legal topic, we then discussed policies on digital first sale, which will determine how digital content is purchased, distributed, and shared, and speculated about how the first sale policy will affect the practice of buying and reselling textbooks, especially considering recent proposals for open, online textbooks. And in case no one noticed, we reminded listeners that the recent US government shut down did, in fact, make a number of government websites that scholars depend on go dark. One government agency doing some pretty cool stuff these days is the Smithsonian, which has launched a project to digitize and then facilitate the 3D printing of artifacts in their collections. And finally, we expressed our shock and outrage that 90% of students use their mobile devices in class for non-class activities. Can you imagine? en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject 3D printing en_US
dc.subject books en_US
dc.subject copyright en_US
dc.subject ebooks en_US
dc.subject Google en_US
dc.subject intellectual property en_US
dc.subject law en_US
dc.subject libraries en_US
dc.subject Library of Congress en_US
dc.subject mobile en_US
dc.subject MOOCs en_US
dc.title Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 101 - Fair Use and Access (Shutdown Edition) en_US
dc.type Presentation en_US
dc.type Sound en_US


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  • Digital Campus Podcasts
    A biweekly discussion of how digital media and technology are affecting learning, teaching, and scholarship at colleges, universities, libraries, and museums.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States

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