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Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 112 - Digital Campus Classic

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dc.contributor.author Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-05T20:53:22Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-05T20:53:22Z
dc.date.issued 2015-03-23
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/11846
dc.description Originally published by the Center for History and New Media through the Digital Campus podcast (http://digitalcampus.tv). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/). en_US
dc.description.abstract Along with Dan Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt, Mills Kelly hosted this classic episode of Digital Campus devoted entirely to technology. Mills, Dan, and Tom discussed the demise of Internet Explorer and IE’s replacement, Spartan, which is meant to complement and facilitate Microsoft’s new operating system. Then the discussion moved to the Apple watch and how such a technology might be adapted for higher education. In continuing with the Apple theme, Mills, Dan, and Tom then talked about the new MacBook that is going to have only one port. Mills reminded the listeners that Steve Jobs is in fact dead, and that creating a laptop with USB drives is an acceptable enterprise. The podcast wrapped up after Mills brought up the Maker Movements. Digital History Fellows Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer produced this podcast. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject Apple en_US
dc.subject Microsoft en_US
dc.title Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 112 - Digital Campus Classic en_US
dc.type Presentation en_US
dc.type Sound en_US


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  • Digital Campus Podcasts
    A biweekly discussion of how digital media and technology are affecting learning, teaching, and scholarship at colleges, universities, libraries, and museums.

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Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States

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