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Telework and Contextual Performance: How Affective Reactions to Telework Influence the Relationships between Telework, LMX, and OCBs

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dc.creator Emily Medvin
dc.date.accessioned 2022-01-25T19:05:51Z
dc.date.available 2022-01-25T19:05:51Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/12297
dc.description.abstract Telework is a common practice, with about 70% of U.S. organizations allowing for telework in some form, and its prevalence is expected to continue to increase. However, opinions in both research and practice remain mixed on the overall effects and implications of telework. Little to no research has examined the relationship between this work arrangement and important organizational outcomes. This study looks at the relationships between extent of telework, LMX, and OCBs through a social exchange theory lens, proposing two similar, yet distinct, affective reactions to telework (gratitude and indebtedness) as mediators of these relationships and trait gratitude and benefit appraisals as moderators. Employees and their direct supervisors were surveyed multiple times over the course of four months. Results offered limited support for these propositions; extent of telework was related to the affective reaction of gratitude, and the affective reaction of indebtedness was related to subsequent LMX. Implications for both research and practice are discussed.
dc.title Telework and Contextual Performance: How Affective Reactions to Telework Influence the Relationships between Telework, LMX, and OCBs
thesis.degree.level Ph.D.
thesis.degree.discipline Psychology
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University


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