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Policy Watch: China and Iraq

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dc.contributor.author Katz, Mark N.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-30T19:01:30Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-30T19:01:30Z
dc.date.issued 2007-01-26
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/5925
dc.description © 2007 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Deposited with permission from UPI.com. en_US
dc.description.abstract Right in the midst of the Bush administration's preparations to send even more American troops to Iraq came news that China successfully fired a missile to destroy one of its own satellites earlier this month. While Chinese officials insist this test was not targeted against any country and does not pose a threat, American officials are understandably concerned. American armed forces heavily depend on satellites. Satellites, however, are vulnerable to missile attack. China's anti-satellite test raises the ominous possibility that Beijing, despite its protestations to the contrary, is developing the capacity to damage or destroy America's military satellite infrastructure. Whether China would ever actually do so is not clear, but just the growing perception that it could might serve to make the United States more cautious and hesitant about responding forcefully to growing Chinese assertiveness.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher UPI.com (United Press International, Inc.) en_US
dc.subject International Affairs en_US
dc.subject Iraq War, 2003-2010 en_US
dc.subject Missiles en_US
dc.subject China en_US
dc.title Policy Watch: China and Iraq en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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