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Policy Watch: Korea after unification

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dc.contributor.author Katz, Mark N.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-30T21:16:07Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-30T21:16:07Z
dc.date.issued 2007-07-06
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/5948
dc.description © 2007 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Deposited with permission from UPI.com. en_US
dc.description.abstract "It may be years away, but the unification of the two Koreas is bound to occur some day -- the most likely route through the collapse of the North. This could occur because ""Dear Leader"" proves to be a threat to too many in the Communist leadership, who agree to unification with the South in exchange for retaining some position of authority in the unified state. Or it could occur as a result of a succession struggle emerging as a result of the demise, incapacitation, or de-legitimation of the ""Dear Leader."" However and whenever it occurs, though, the unification of Korea is likely to result in the government of the South taking over the entire country. If this indeed happens, how will this affect Korea's international relations?" en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher UPI.com (United Press International, Inc.) en_US
dc.subject International Affairs en_US
dc.subject Korea en_US
dc.title Policy Watch: Korea after unification en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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