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Stress related changes in purine, tyrosine and tryptophan metabolites of Caenorhabditis elegans

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dc.contributor.advisor Willett, James D.
dc.contributor.author Podugu, Neeraja
dc.creator Podugu, Neeraja
dc.date 2010-11-01
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-25T14:53:53Z
dc.date.available NO_RESTRICTION en_US
dc.date.available 2011-05-25T14:53:53Z
dc.date.issued 2011-05-25
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/6346
dc.description.abstract Caenorhabditis elegans has been used as a model organism in many areas of research over the last few decades. This research investigated stress related changes in C.elegans following exposure to different components of B.anthracis and varying dosages of lead acetate. Metabolites of purine, tyrosine and tryptophan pathways of C.elegans were measured using high profile liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection. Perturbations in metabolites of these pathways in C.elegans were measured and compared to the metabolites of the untreated. C.elegans cultures grown under axenic and monoxenic conditions responded differently to the same stressors. The results from this research support the hypothesis that a relationship exists between the initial stress response and the subsequent changes in the metabolic constituents of purine, tyrosine and/or tryptophan pathways of C.elegans. The exposure of axenic mixed cultures of C.elegans to a Bacillus anthracis threetoxin combination resulted in an acute response showing perturbations in purine, tyrosine and tryptophan pathways. Increasing the concentration of lead affected growth in axenic young, reproductive processes in axenic middle aged after 1.5 days of exposure whereas the adult C.elegans lysed. Perturbations in analytes of purine, tyrosine and tryptophan, as well as unknown analytes specific to the life stage and dosage of lead treatment, were observed. Axenic and monoxenic C.elegans demonstrated time and dose-dependent responses to lead exposure. Axenic C.elegans cultures responded to biological stressors and lead acetate more rapidly than monoxenic cultures, suggesting that axenic cultures could provide a superior model system for measuring acute stress responses.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Caenorhabditis Elegans en_US
dc.subject Tyrosine en_US
dc.subject Metabolomics en_US
dc.subject Tryptophan en_US
dc.subject Purine en_US
dc.subject Axenic en_US
dc.title Stress related changes in purine, tyrosine and tryptophan metabolites of Caenorhabditis elegans en_US
dc.type Dissertation en
thesis.degree.name PhD in Biosciences en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline Biosciences en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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