Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Seligmann, Linda J.
dc.contributor.author Kosovych, Danylo
dc.creator Kosovych, Danylo
dc.date 2010-12-08
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-25T15:28:36Z
dc.date.available NO_RESTRICTION en_US
dc.date.available 2011-05-25T15:28:36Z
dc.date.issued 2011-05-25
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/6351
dc.description.abstract This thesis explores the use of ayahuasca, a hallucinogenic plant concoction from the Amazon, by people from the English speaking world. This thesis argues that there is no “original” or “typical” use of ayahuasca; it is a dynamic practice that has undergone massive change. In order to show this change, this thesis describes the different roles that shamans have had as a result of colonialism and modernization. Fieldwork was carried out at a healing center in the Peruvian Amazon. The motivations of informants and the effects ayahuasca had on them are compared with previous research on non-native ayahuasca use. The motivations of non-natives for taking ayahuasca are different from native motivations. The two main reasons are a desire for an end to alienation and a resolution of emotional trauma. Nearly all participants reported positive experiences from taking ayahuasca. The ayahuasca intoxication produces a liminal period, in which participants are able to reflect upon the issues affecting them.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject Ayahuasca en_US
dc.subject shamanism en_US
dc.subject tourism en_US
dc.subject Amazon en_US
dc.subject spirituality en_US
dc.subject New Age en_US
dc.title Non-Native Ayahuasca Use en_US
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.name Master's in Anthropology en_US
thesis.degree.level Master's en
thesis.degree.discipline Anthropology en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search MARS


Browse

My Account

Statistics