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The Politics of Style: Fashioning the Student Body

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dc.contributor.advisor Best, Amy L.
dc.contributor.author Pendry, Caroline
dc.creator Pendry, Caroline
dc.date 2012-05-03
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-08T14:19:59Z
dc.date.available NO_RESTRICTION en_US
dc.date.available 2012-10-08T14:19:59Z
dc.date.issued 2012-10-08
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/7962
dc.description.abstract This study investigates how students at George Mason University negotiate and construct their identities through dress, hairstyles, and other alterations to the body. Whether we see ourselves as an environmentalist or feminist, Muslim or Christian, female or male, black or white, we employ clothing and hair styles that both reflect and reify these affiliations. Style is also deeply imbedded within youth culture and shown to be a primary mode of distinction in which youth are involved in positioning themselves within the social, cultural, and political landscape. Through clothing and hairstyle, the students in this research consume cultural materials in an effort to express and represent individual identity claims that simultaneously locate them within social categories relating to race, class, gender, and sexuality. The politics of style emerge as students use marks of distinction to draw symbolic boundaries in which they align and distance themselves with moral and ideological belief systems.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.subject style en_US
dc.subject identity en_US
dc.subject the body en_US
dc.subject consumption en_US
dc.subject women and gender studies en_US
dc.subject youth culture en_US
dc.title The Politics of Style: Fashioning the Student Body en_US
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.name Master of Arts in Sociology en_US
thesis.degree.level Master's en
thesis.degree.discipline Sociology en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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