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Nurses' Emotional Response and Likelihood of Disclosure Following Errors in Clinical Practice

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dc.contributor.advisor Rodan, Margaret
dc.contributor.author Swartwout, Ellen
dc.creator Swartwout, Ellen en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-28T03:09:42Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-28T03:09:42Z
dc.date.issued 2013-08 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/8767
dc.description.abstract Errors happen in the nursing profession, creating an at-risk environment for nurses and patients. The fiscal, emotional, professional, and legal impact of nursing errors is remarkable. An examination of the nurse’s emotional response after a discovery of a nursing error is a critical element of study in order to understand and develop systems that recognize the psychological impact of a nursing error and its influence on nurses’ disclosure of errors. Without disclosure, error management systems cannot improve. Measurement of nurses’ emotional response after an error in clinical practice and its influence on nurses’ disclosure is a clear gap in the research. The purpose of this study was to explore the construct of nurses’ emotional response and its influence on nurses’ disclosure following errors in clinical practice. The development and testing of an instrument to measure nurses’ emotional response after an error in clinical practice was examined. In addition, the influence of the nurse’s emotional response upon discovery of an error in clinical practice and the likelihood for disclosure was explored. The conceptual framework for this study was Crigger and Meek’s theory of Self-Reconciliation Following Mistakes in Nursing Practice (Crigger & Meek, 2007). This research gives nurses the opportunity to test their experience and inform the profession to identify suitable interventions to create a culture of disclosure that benefits patient safety efforts. Results are indicative of a valid and reliable tool to measure nurses’ emotional response following an error in clinical practice. Cronbach’s alpha was (.935) for the total scale reliability. The variable that demonstrated a significant difference in reference to a strong emotional response, (n=459), was unit support at the time of the error, (p=.023). Tested in those who had recalled an error within the last year, a strong emotional response was a significant predictor in the final model. In the final model, (n=82), a strong emotional response was a significant predictor, (p=.004), of filing of an incident report. Qualitative findings indicated that nurses believe disclosure is important for error management, yet also reported that they thought underreporting occurs. Work environment and support of colleagues was also noted as an important aspect of influencing disclosure. Findings from this research have implications for administration, education, practice, and policy with regard to patient safety and error reduction strategies for the nursing discipline.
dc.format.extent 200 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Copyright 2013 Ellen Swartwout en_US
dc.subject Nursing en_US
dc.subject disclosure en_US
dc.subject emotional distress en_US
dc.subject incident report en_US
dc.subject medical errors en_US
dc.subject nursing en_US
dc.subject patient safety en_US
dc.title Nurses' Emotional Response and Likelihood of Disclosure Following Errors in Clinical Practice en_US
dc.type Dissertation en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline Nursing en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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