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A Challenge to the Cause: Smallpox Inoculation in the Era of American Independence, 1764-1781

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dc.contributor.advisor Scully, Randolph
dc.contributor.author Weir, Jeffrey Michael
dc.creator Weir, Jeffrey Michael en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-18T01:53:11Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-18T01:53:11Z
dc.date.issued 2014-05 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/8840
dc.description.abstract This dissertation examines how smallpox inoculation helped shape the character of the American Revolution from the first rumblings of colonial discontent in 1764 until the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781. First used in the colonies in 1721, inoculation was a life-saving but controversial procedure. Although many historians have explored the effects of smallpox on the Revolutionary cause, few have explained the threats engendered by the use of inoculation itself on the patriot movement.
dc.format.extent 407 pages en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.rights Copyright 2014 Jeffrey Michael Weir en_US
dc.subject American history en_US
dc.subject History en_US
dc.subject Public health en_US
dc.subject American Revolution en_US
dc.subject Continental Army en_US
dc.subject Disease en_US
dc.subject Inoculation en_US
dc.subject Smallpox en_US
dc.subject Smallpox Inoculation en_US
dc.title A Challenge to the Cause: Smallpox Inoculation in the Era of American Independence, 1764-1781 en_US
dc.type Dissertation en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline History en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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