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Norm Wars: The Evolution of Norms for Emerging-Technology Weapons, from Chemical Weapons to Cyber Warfare

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dc.contributor.advisor Thrall, A. Trevor
dc.contributor.author Mazanec, Brian M.
dc.creator Mazanec, Brian M.
dc.date 2014-05
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-19T01:43:28Z
dc.date.available 2015-01-16T20:34:05Z
dc.date.issued 2014-09-18
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/8938
dc.description.abstract This study seeks to explain how constraining norms for cyber warfare—along with other emerging-technology weapons—are developing and will develop in the future. To do so, it develops a theory based on case studies on the evolution of norms for other emerging- technology weapons—specifically chemical and biological weapons, strategic bombing, and nuclear weapons. This research expands norm evolution theory, which is not specifically focused on warfare or emerging-technology weapons, and also contributes to nascent efforts to address the emerging cyber threat by developing a better understanding of norm evolution for cyber warfare. Ultimately, this study argues that for emerging- technology weapons direct or indirect alignment of national self-interest with a constraining norm is the primary factor that leads to norm emergence and the extent to which it is aligned with key or powerful states’ perception of self-interest will determine how rapidly and effectively the norm emerges. Specific to cyber warfare, this study argues that while an increasing number of actors and organizational platforms are cultivating multiple candidate norms for cyber warfare, constraining norms will have trouble emerging and may never reach a norm cascade. Of the current candidate cyber norms, the most likely to succeed are those that are more limited in scope, such as those focused on the application of the existing laws of armed conflict to cyber warfare. In light of these findings, this study concludes by offering various recommendations for U.S. policymakers and identifies further research opportunities to continue to develop norm evolution theory for emerging-technology weapons. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights Copyright 2014 Brian M. Mazanec en_US
dc.subject cyber warfare en_US
dc.title Norm Wars: The Evolution of Norms for Emerging-Technology Weapons, from Chemical Weapons to Cyber Warfare en_US
dc.type Dissertation en
dc.description.note This work was embargoed by the author and will not be available until November 2014. en_US
thesis.degree.name PhD in Biodefense en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline Biodefense en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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