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Black Early Childhood Teachers’ Perspectives Regarding Overrepresentation of Black Students in Special Education

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dc.contributor.advisor Burns, M. Susan
dc.contributor.advisor Kidd, Julie K.
dc.contributor.author Shorter, Raymond D'angelo
dc.creator Shorter, Raymond D'angelo
dc.date 2014-12
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-30T17:20:34Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-01T07:41:09Z
dc.date.issued 2015-03-30
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/9240
dc.description.abstract This qualitative study investigated Black early childhood teachers' perspectives regarding overrepresentation of Black early childhood students in special education programs for mild disabilities. In a semi-structured interview with teachers (n=9), participants responded to open-ended questions regarding their perceptions of overrepresentation as well as solutions to eliminate overrepresentation. Several themes emerged: knowledge of self, student evaluations, parent support, and teacher advocacy. The teachers concluded the following: (a) it is important for them to instill positive and healthy racial identity in Black students, (b) evaluators must use culturally competent evaluation methods for evaluating students for special education placement, (c) parents need to be involved in their children's academic progress, and (d) teachers should advocate against special education placement for students who are inappropriately evaluated. In addition, the teachers believed that educators and parents must address issues and challenges facing overrepresentation so they can implement solutions to eliminate overrepresentation. Suggested solutions included (a) involvement of parents, (b) training and resources for parents, (c) teachers communicating and connecting with families, (d) teachers advocating on behalf of students, and (e) creating cultural competent evaluations. Suggestions for future research regarding Black early childhood students in special education programs included further investigation on how overrepresentation is perceived by parents, students, and teachers as well as investigating what solutions should be implemented to eliminate overrepresentation for Black students with mild disabilities.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights Copyright 2014 Raymond D'angelo Shorter en_US
dc.subject African American en_US
dc.subject Early childhood en_US
dc.subject Special Education en_US
dc.title Black Early Childhood Teachers’ Perspectives Regarding Overrepresentation of Black Students in Special Education en_US
dc.type Dissertation en
dc.description.note This work was embargoed by the author and will not be publicly available until January 1, 2020. en_US
thesis.degree.name PhD in Education en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline Education en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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