Mason Archival Repository Service

The everyday activities that bind for crime: Investigating the process of routine activities theory at specific places

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Lum, Cynthia
dc.contributor.author Olaghere, Ajima Maria
dc.creator Olaghere, Ajima Maria
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-29T18:40:41Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-29T18:40:41Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/9658
dc.description.abstract This dissertation explores why and how crime events routinely occur at specific places in high crime areas, such as street blocks, addresses, street corners, and intersections. Specifically, this dissertation considers what human activities, behaviors, routines, and situations contribute to crime occurring at these places. Routine activities theory and environmental criminology suggest that crime is a process resulting from the convergence of the daily human routines of offenders, targets, and guardians (or lack thereof). Furthermore, these opportunities for crime are sustained, enhanced, or limited based on surrounding physical and environmental features of where crimes occur.
dc.format.extent 223 pages
dc.language.iso en
dc.rights Copyright 2015 Ajima Maria Olaghere
dc.subject Criminology en_US
dc.subject Crime pattern theory en_US
dc.subject Drug crime en_US
dc.subject Environmental criminology en_US
dc.subject Routine activities theory en_US
dc.subject Systematic social observation en_US
dc.title The everyday activities that bind for crime: Investigating the process of routine activities theory at specific places
dc.type Dissertation en
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline Criminology, Law and Society en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search MARS


Browse

My Account

Statistics