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Developmental and Gender Differences in Elementary Students’ Self-Regulation, Self-Efficacy, and Sources of Self-Efficacy in Mathematics: An Exploratory Study

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dc.contributor.advisor Kitsantas, Anastasia
dc.contributor.author Lau, Christina
dc.creator Lau, Christina
dc.date 2015-04-29
dc.date.accessioned 2015-08-13T13:47:11Z
dc.date.available 2015-08-13T13:47:11Z
dc.date.issued 2015-08-13
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/9737
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study is to examine the developmental differences of elementary students’ self-regulation, self-efficacy, and sources of self-efficacy, and to assess whether these variables differ as a function of gender across grade levels. Participants in this study included 442 third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade students from U.S. International Baccalaureate schools. Self-report measures were used to assess students’ self-regulation (i.e., Perceived Responsibility for Learning Scale), self-efficacy, and sources of selfefficacy in mathematics. The results of this exploratory study showed that mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, social persuasions, and physiological states accounted for a significant amount of variance in students’ mathematics self-efficacy. Social persuasions were the strongest predictor of mathematics self-efficacy. Boys reported stronger perceived responsibility, mastery experiences, social persuasions, and physiological states than did girls. Mastery experiences were the strongest indicator of mathematics self-efficacy for girls. Limitations and implications for future research and practice are discussed.
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject self-regulation en_US
dc.subject self-efficacy en_US
dc.subject mathematics en_US
dc.subject elementary students en_US
dc.subject development en_US
dc.subject gender differences en_US
dc.title Developmental and Gender Differences in Elementary Students’ Self-Regulation, Self-Efficacy, and Sources of Self-Efficacy in Mathematics: An Exploratory Study en_US
dc.type Thesis en
thesis.degree.name Master of Science in Educational Psychology en_US
thesis.degree.level Master's en
thesis.degree.discipline Educational Psychology en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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