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Enhanced Detection of Influenza with Nanotrap Particles

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dc.contributor.advisor Kehn-Hall, Kylene
dc.contributor.author Shafagati, Nazly
dc.creator Shafagati, Nazly
dc.date 2015-05
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-01T14:37:02Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-15T06:45:17Z
dc.date.issued 2015-09-01
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/9820
dc.description This work was embargoed by the author and will not be publicly available until May 2020. en_US
dc.description.abstract The Influenza virus is a leading cause of respiratory disease in the United States each year. The virus normally causes mild to moderate disease, however, hospitalization and death can occur in many cases. While there are several methodologies that are used for detection, problems such as decreased sensitivity and high false-negatives may arise. There is a crucial need for a fast, yet highly specific detection method. Nanotrap particles work to enrich whole virus and can be coupled to various downstream assays. Here, we demonstrate how Nanotrap particles with acrylic acid baits can be used to concentrate virus from high sample volumes and enhance detection up to 6-fold when coupled to plaque assays and qRT-PCR methodologies. The acrylic acid Nanotrap particles can concentrate virus from nasal fluid swab specimens and nasal aspirates. Importantly, the Nanotrap particles stabilize and protect the virus from degradation over extended periods of time and elevated temperatures. Lastly, in a coinfection scenario, other pathogens such as Coronavirus and Streptococcus pneumoniae do not interfere with capture of Influenza virus. These results collectively demonstrate that Nanotrap particles are an important tool that can easily be integrated into various detection methodologies.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights Copyright 2015 Nazly Shafagati en_US
dc.subject Diagnostics en_US
dc.subject Influenza en_US
dc.subject Nanotrap particles en_US
dc.title Enhanced Detection of Influenza with Nanotrap Particles en_US
dc.type Dissertation en
thesis.degree.name PhD in Biosciences en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline Biology en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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