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Age-Independent Rise of Inflammatory Scores May Contribute to Accelerated Aging in Multi-Morbidity

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dc.contributor.author Stepanova, Maria
dc.contributor.author Rodriguez, Edgar
dc.contributor.author Birerdinc, Aybike
dc.contributor.author Baranova, Ancha
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-16T15:53:32Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-16T15:53:32Z
dc.date.issued 2015-02-10
dc.identifier.citation Stepanova, M., Rodriguez, E., Birerdinc, A., & Baranova, A. (2015). Age-independent rise of inflammatory scores may contribute to accelerated aging in multi-morbidity. Oncotarget, 6(3), 1414-1421. en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/9887
dc.description.abstract Aging is associated with an increase in a chronic, low-grade inflammation. This phenomenon, termed “inflammaging” is also a risk factor for both morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Frequent co-occurrence of chronic diseases, known as multi-morbidity, may be explained by interconnected pathophysiology of these conditions, most of which depend on its inflammatory component. Here we present an analysis of the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data collected between 1999 and 2008, for the presence, and the number, of chronic diseases along with HDL-cholesterol, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, lymphocyte percent, monocyte percent, segmented neutrophils percent, eosinophils percent, basophils percent, and glycohemoglobin levels. Importantly, even after adjustment for age and BMI, many inflammatory markers continued to be associated to multi-morbidity. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) were most dramatically increased in parallel with an accumulation of chronic diseases, and may be utilized as multi-morbidity predictors. These observations point at background inflammation as direct, age-independent contributor to an accumulation of the disease burden. Our findings also suggest a possibility that systemic inflammation associated with chronic diseases may explain accelerated aging phenomenon previously observed among the patients with heavy disease burden.
dc.description.sponsorship Publication of this article was funded in part by the George Mason University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Impact Journals, LLC en_US
dc.rights Attribution 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject multi-morbidit en_US
dc.subject C-reactive protein en_US
dc.subject systemic inflammation en_US
dc.subject Glasgow Prognostic Score en_US
dc.subject aging en_US
dc.title Age-Independent Rise of Inflammatory Scores May Contribute to Accelerated Aging in Multi-Morbidity en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.2725
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.2725


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