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Exploring Linkages Between Generativity, Mentoring, and Job Satisfaction Among Federal Government Employees

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dc.contributor.advisor Thrall, A. Trevor
dc.contributor.author Curry, Jeffrey W.
dc.creator Curry, Jeffrey W.
dc.date 2015-08
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-18T15:46:49Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-15T01:22:43Z
dc.date.issued 2015-09-18
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/9893
dc.description This work was embargoed by the author and will not be publicly available until August 2016. en_US
dc.description.abstract This study examines the association between job satisfaction among United States Federal agency employees and agency mentoring programs, such as those provided by the National Security Agency (NSA), the Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program (SESCDP), and the Presidential Management Fellow Program (PMF). Faced with the looming departure of significant numbers of baby boomers, the Federal government is tasked with developing the next generation of workers comprising the civilian workforce who currently perform a range of mission-critical duties. While mentoring programs have been extensively studied in the private sector, scant attention has been paid to the unique challenges faced by Federal agencies and their need to foster generativity, that is, concern for developing the next generation of workers. Personnel reductions, furloughs, pay freezes, and budget cuts, along with record numbers of retirement-eligible workers, have contributed to a potentially crippling knowledge gap within the remaining civilian workforce. This study, underpinned by a theoretical framework based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Erikson's concept of generativity, identifies factors that affect job satisfaction and intention to quit. The study analyzes these factors in correlation with the perceived effectiveness of government agency mentoring programs. Findings can be used to inform best practices for developing generativity-conscious leaders to fill the void that will be left in the coming years by departing Federal workers. As a result, the Department of Defense (DOD) and Federal agencies will be in a better position to grow and develop the civilian workforce, resulting in improved organizational outcomes.
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights Copyright 2015 Jeffrey W. Curry en_US
dc.subject Civilian en_US
dc.subject Federal government en_US
dc.subject Job satisfaction en_US
dc.subject Turnover en_US
dc.title Exploring Linkages Between Generativity, Mentoring, and Job Satisfaction Among Federal Government Employees en_US
dc.type Dissertation en
thesis.degree.name PhD in Biodefense en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline Biodefense en
thesis.degree.grantor George Mason University en


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