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Effect of compensatory acceleration training in combination with accommodating resistance on upper body strength in collegiate athletes

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dc.contributor.author Jones, Margaret T.
dc.date.accessioned 2014-09-15T17:04:45Z
dc.date.available 2014-09-15T17:04:45Z
dc.date.issued 2014-08-04
dc.identifier.citation Jones, Margaret T. Effect of compensatory acceleration training in combination with accommodating resistance on upper body strength in collegiate athletes. Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine 5:183-189. doi:10.2147/OAJSM.S65877 (2013). en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1920/8816
dc.description Original research en_US
dc.description.abstract Purpose: To determine the impact of inclusion of a band or chain compensatory acceleration training (CAT), in a 5-week training phase, on maximal upper body strength during a 14-week off-season strength and conditioning program for collegiate male athletes. Patients and methods: Twenty-four National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) collegiate baseball players, who were familiar with the current strength and conditioning program and had a minimum of 1 year of formal collegiate strength and conditioning experience, participated in this off-season training study. None of the men had participated in CAT before. Subjects were matched following a maximal effort (1-repetition maximum [1-RM]) bench press test in week 1, then were randomly assigned into a band-based CAT group or a chain-based CAT group and participated in a 5-week training phase that included bench pressing twice per week. Upper body strength was measured by 1-RM bench press again at week 6. A 2 × 2 mixed factorial (method × time) analysis of variance was calculated to compare differences across groups. The alpha level was set at P,0.05. Results: No difference (F1,22=0.04, P=0.84) existed between the band-based CAT and chain-based CAT groups. A significant difference was observed between pre- and posttests of 1-RM bench (F1,22=88.46, P=0.001). Conclusion: A 5-week band CAT or chain CAT training program used in conjunction with an off-season strength and conditioning program can increase maximal upper body strength in collegiate baseball athletes. Using band CAT and/or chain CAT as a training modality in the off-season will vary the training stimulus from the traditional and likely help to maintain the athlete’s interest. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Dove Medical Press Lmtd. en_US
dc.rights Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject variable resistance en_US
dc.subject resistance training en_US
dc.subject male athletes en_US
dc.subject compensatory acceleration training en_US
dc.subject upper body strength en_US
dc.subject band CAT en_US
dc.subject chain CAT en_US
dc.subject baseball players en_US
dc.title Effect of compensatory acceleration training in combination with accommodating resistance on upper body strength in collegiate athletes en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAJSM.S65877


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