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Continuous Carryover of Temporal Context Dissociates Response Bias from Perceptual Influence for Duration

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dc.contributor.author Wiener, Martin
dc.contributor.author Thompson, James C.
dc.contributor.author Coslett, H. Branch
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-01T19:30:42Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-01T19:30:42Z
dc.date.issued 2014-06-25
dc.identifier.citation Wiener M, Thompson JC, Coslett HB (2014) Continuous Carryover of Temporal Context Dissociates Response Bias from Perceptual Influence for Duration. PLoS ONE 9(6): e100803. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0100803 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/9915
dc.description.abstract Recent experimental evidence suggests that the perception of temporal intervals is influenced by the temporal context in which they are presented. A longstanding example is the time-order-error, wherein the perception of two intervals relative to one another is influenced by the order in which they are presented. Here, we test whether the perception of temporal intervals in an absolute judgment task is influenced by the preceding temporal context. Human subjects participated in a temporal bisection task with no anchor durations (partition method). Intervals were demarcated by a Gaussian blob (visual condition) or burst of white noise (auditory condition) that persisted for one of seven logarithmically spaced sub-second intervals. Crucially, the order in which stimuli were presented was first-order counterbalanced, allowing us to measure the carryover effect of every successive combination of intervals. The results demonstrated a number of distinct findings. First, the perception of each interval was biased by the prior response, such that each interval was judged similarly to the preceding trial. Second, the perception of each interval was also influenced by the prior interval, such that perceived duration shifted away from the preceding interval. Additionally, the effect of decision bias was larger for visual intervals, whereas auditory intervals engendered greater perceptual carryover. We quantified these effects by designing a biologically-inspired computational model that measures noisy representations of time against an adaptive memory prior while simultaneously accounting for uncertainty, consistent with a Bayesian heuristic. We found that our model could account for all of the effects observed in human data. Additionally, our model could only accommodate both carryover effects when uncertainty and memory were calculated separately, suggesting separate neural representations for each. These findings demonstrate that time is susceptible to similar carryover effects as other basic stimulus attributes, and that the brain rapidly adapts to temporal context.
dc.description.sponsorship Publication of this article was funded in part by the George Mason University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_US
dc.rights Attribution 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject vision en_US
dc.subject sensory perception en_US
dc.subject memory en_US
dc.subject psychometrics en_US
dc.subject human performance en_US
dc.subject sequence analysis en_US
dc.subject graphs en_US
dc.subject permutation en_US
dc.title Continuous Carryover of Temporal Context Dissociates Response Bias from Perceptual Influence for Duration en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0100803


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