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Who is Most Vulnerable to Social Rejection? The Toxic Combination of Low Self-Esteem and Lack of Negative Emotion Differentiation on Neural Responses to Rejection

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dc.contributor.author Kashdan, Todd B.
dc.contributor.author DeWall, C. Nathan
dc.contributor.author Masten, Carrie L.
dc.contributor.author Pond, Richard S., Jr.
dc.contributor.author Powell, Caitlin
dc.contributor.author Combs, David
dc.contributor.author Schurtz, David R.
dc.contributor.author Farmer, Antonina S.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-10-15T15:24:37Z
dc.date.available 2015-10-15T15:24:37Z
dc.date.issued 2014-03-04
dc.identifier.citation Kashdan TB, DeWall CN, Masten CL, Pond RS Jr, Powell C, Combs D, et al. (2014) Who Is Most Vulnerable to Social Rejection? The Toxic Combination of Low Self-Esteem and Lack of Negative Emotion Differentiation on Neural Responses to Rejection. PLoS ONE 9(3): e90651. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0090651 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1920/9949
dc.description.abstract People have a fundamental need to belong that, when satisfied, is associated with mental and physical well-being. The current investigation examined what happens when the need to belong is thwarted—and how individual differences in self-esteem and emotion differentiation modulate neural responses to social rejection. We hypothesized that low self-esteem would predict heightened activation in distress-related neural responses during a social rejection manipulation, but that this relationship would be moderated by negative emotion differentiation—defined as adeptness at using discrete negative emotion categories to capture one's felt experience. Combining daily diary and neuroimaging methodologies, the current study showed that low self-esteem and low negative emotion differentiation represented a toxic combination that was associated with stronger activation during social rejection (versus social inclusion) in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula—two regions previously shown to index social distress. In contrast, individuals with greater negative emotion differentiation did not show stronger activation in these regions, regardless of their level of self-esteem; fitting with prior evidence that negative emotion differentiation confers equanimity in emotionally upsetting situations.
dc.description.sponsorship Publication of this article was funded in part by the George Mason University Libraries Open Access Publishing Fund. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_US
dc.rights Attribution 3.0 United States *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/ *
dc.subject emotions en_US
dc.subject games en_US
dc.subject neuroimaging en_US
dc.subject interpersonal relationships en_US
dc.subject behavior en_US
dc.subject psychological stress en_US
dc.subject data acquisition en_US
dc.subject social research en_US
dc.title Who is Most Vulnerable to Social Rejection? The Toxic Combination of Low Self-Esteem and Lack of Negative Emotion Differentiation on Neural Responses to Rejection en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.identifier.doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0090651


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