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Digital Campus Podcasts

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A biweekly discussion of how digital media and technology are affecting learning, teaching, and scholarship at colleges, universities, libraries, and museums.

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    Digital Campus Podcast Website
    (Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, 2015) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /; Cohen, Dan; French, Amanda; Kelly, Mills; Robertson, Stephen; Scheinfeldt, Tom
    This is the website for the Digital Campus podcast, a discussion of how digital media and technology affect learning, teaching, and scholarship at colleges, universities, libraries, and museums. Hosted at digitalcampus.tv.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 118 - Predicting the Past - 2015 Year in Review
    (2015-12-19) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    In the 2015 installment of the Digital Campus Year in Review podcast, regulars Dan Cohen, Amanda French, Tom Scheinfeldt, and Stephen Robertson look back at 2015 and predict the big news of 2016. Cheers went out to the NEH/Mellon Humanities Open Book Program, Congress (c.1965), the retirement of James Billington as Librarian of Congress, and the US Court of Appeals decision in favor of Google Books. Eliciting jeers were the Ad-blocker controversy, the behavior of Proquest (with Amanda dissenting), and the news that Jennifer Howard has left the higher education beat. Much of what the group predicted for 2015 came to pass, to some extent: universities were hacked; SHARE developed; the push to learn to code continued; and Proquest and Gale moved to provide data mining access to their collections (at considerable additional cost to libraries). And, with the FAA moving to require that drones be registered, Mills’s prediction from 2013 that an Amazon drone will be shot down over Texas looks ever more likely. If you are impressed by those predictions, then in 2016 you should expect the Wu Tang Clan album to leak, Virtual Reality MOOCs to be launched, a digital humanist to win a Macarthur Fellowship, hypothes.is not to take off (or to enjoy the same success as DPLA), and emojis to replace text as our primary form of communication.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 117 - What Can You Do With iPads & Smartphones?
    (2015-11-19) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    Dan’s visit to the Apple Store prompts a discussion of the new iPad Pro, and just what you can and can’t do on Apple’s tablet. Are we all just too old to give up our laptops for tablets? The New York Times and Google recently teamed up to deliver another way to use your smartphone – for virtual reality, via Google Cardboard. Is this the beginning of an expansion of VR? Or is it just the View-Master of Mills’ and Stephen’s youth reborn? Finally, we discussed the recent study of media use by tweens and teens by Common Sense Media that highlighted the digital disparities facing low-income teens. In particular, although most have smartphones, they lack access to laptops or desktops on which to do the increasing amount of online homework teachers are assigning. Stephen and Dan talked about the key role of public libraries in giving teenagers access to computers and wireless Internet.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 116 - The Last Episode Ever About that Google Books Case (or is it?)
    (2015-10-20) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    Great timing for us, as we record the podcast on the very day the US Appeals Court rules that yes, scanning in-copyright books for the purpose of creating an online index of them is indeed a transformative and therefore fair use. Huzzah! The way is clear for all kinds of things now. We also talk about a new digital humanities / libraries tool called BigDIVA that launched today, discussing mainly its plan to become a subscription-based paid service. That leads into a brief digression on the recent patent win by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation against Apple, which could potentially raise almost half a billion dollars for the University of Wisconsin system (just enough to make up for proposed budget cuts). We refrain from comment. Finally, Stephen Robertson reports on RRCHNM’s plan to build a new tool called Tropy, which would help researchers organize the pictures they take in archives.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 115 - The Mills is in Basel Edition
    (2015-10-06) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    The regulars (Stephen, Tom, Amanda, and Dan) are back for a new semester and a new season of Digital Campus in which we wave to Mills as he jaunts about Europe. We also talk about some of the summer and early autumn’s big news, including the NEH ODH’s project directors meeting, the 50th anniversary of the NEH, Librarian of Congress James Billington’s retirement, and the George Mason University History Department’s new digital dissertation guidelines. Other mentions include: – UConn historical musical instruments project – John Donne’s 1622 sermon for Gunpowder Day: Virtual Paul’s Cross Project – NEH Anniversary Message from President Obama – NEH Funding Levels, American Academy of Arts and Sciences Check back in two weeks for more from the world of digital humanities, libraries, and museums and to see where Mills lands on another episode of Digital Campus.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 114 - What to do with your (digital) scholarship
    (2015-05-11) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    On this episode — #114, not #115 as Stephen mistakenly claims in the introduction — the full crew of regulars, Dan Cohen, Amanda French, Stephen Robertson and Tom Scheinfeldt discuss the MLA’s new repository, the AHA’s draft guidelines for assessing digital scholarship, and the tenth anniversary of YouTube. But first Dan talked about his visit to the White House, and Amanda described her new job as Director of Research and Informatics for the Virginia Tech Libraries. And Mills needed to know, did Dan wear an Apple watch to meet the President?
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 113 - You Can't Trust Everything on the Web
    (2015-04-13) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    On this episode of Digital Campus, host Mills Kelly, along with Dan Cohen, Amanda French, and Stephen Robertson discuss the role of technology in the classroom and some of history’s most teachable moments courtesy of the US Postal Service. To begin, everyone weighs in on the Maya Angelou stamp controversy and whether or not quotation inaccuracies are getting worse because of the internet. Then the crew discusses a recent survey by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation which found that only 20% of college and university professors have used “high-tech teaching methods.” Dan argues that the majority of professors default to textbook teaching just to get the job done. While professors lack digital diversity, the group then shifts to discussing whether the Apple watch could cause problems in the classroom. Could widespread adoption of wearable technology lead to easier cheating? The podcast wrapped up by congratulating Amanda on being elected to the THAT Camp counsel for another year and the announcement that THAT Camp has switched to Reclaim Hosting.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 112 - Digital Campus Classic
    (2015-03-23) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    Along with Dan Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt, Mills Kelly hosted this classic episode of Digital Campus devoted entirely to technology. Mills, Dan, and Tom discussed the demise of Internet Explorer and IE’s replacement, Spartan, which is meant to complement and facilitate Microsoft’s new operating system. Then the discussion moved to the Apple watch and how such a technology might be adapted for higher education. In continuing with the Apple theme, Mills, Dan, and Tom then talked about the new MacBook that is going to have only one port. Mills reminded the listeners that Steve Jobs is in fact dead, and that creating a laptop with USB drives is an acceptable enterprise. The podcast wrapped up after Mills brought up the Maker Movements. Digital History Fellows Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer produced this podcast.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 111 - The Next Big Thing
    (2015-02-23) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    After a long break, our podcast regulars, Stephen Robertson and Mills Kelly, were led by Amanda French in our first 2015 podcast. After a quick check-in on their current projects, the group kicked it off with a review of the winter academic conferences. Next, they discussed the announcement that Stanford University Press was awarded funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for the publishing of interactive scholarly works. On the subject of digital scholarship, Amanda mentioned the Humanities Open Book project which was recently funded by both the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Mellon Foundation. Shifting the discussion to pedagogy, Mills addressed the way in which students may engage with the humanities differently through wearable computing. This podcast was produced by Digital History Fellows Jordan Bratt and Jannelle Legg.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 110 - 2014 in Review
    (2014-12-19) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    ‘Twas the last podcast of 2014 and on this episode of Digital Campus, Amanda, Tom, Dan, and Stephen discussed their “Cheers and Jeers” for the year (with RRCHNM Digital History Fellow Amanda Regan filling in for Mills). MLA, IMLS, FCC, and the lack of a government shutdown won the praise of the group, but Twitter could not stand up to the pressures of 2014. After describing the good and the bad of the year, the group discussed their predictions from 2013. While Mills’s prediction that an Amazon drone would be shot out of the sky in Texas did not come true, it appears that many of the predictions made by the group last year were pretty close–even though Dan gave himself a solid “B”. With 2015 quickly approaching, everyone discussed their latest predictions for the new year and where the digital humanities are headed in the next 365 days.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 109 - What Do Fabio and Naked Laptops Have in Common?
    (2014-11-18) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    This Digital Campus episode was recorded live by Chris Preperato during Friday’s second afternoon session of the RRCHNM’s 20th Anniversary Conference and was produced by Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer. Mills Kelly, Stephen Robertson, and Tom Scheinfeldt joined host Dan Cohen to recap the earlier sessions of the day, including discussions on failure, ECHO, History Makers, pedagogy, and digital humanities centers’ websites. The floor was opened for a question and answer session, and audience participants and those on Twitter asked about Tom’s laptop’s dearth of stickers, how to convey scholarship to a broad audience, and gender and digital history centers.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 108 - Things That Go Bump in the Night: copyright, interviews and other scary things
    (2014-11-03) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    For this episode, Tom Scheinfeld led our podcast regulars, Dan Cohen, Stephen Robertson, Amanda French, and Mills Kelly, in a Halloween episode produced by Jordan Bratt and Jannelle Legg. After a brief discussion of Halloween plans, the group delved into the subject of copyright and creative commons as Dan described the DPLA’s involvement in an international rights meeting in Amsterdam. The discussion then led to the recent Harvard decision and the complexity of digital surrogates, creative commons, and institutional holdings. Next, Mills directed the group to the ongoing Georgia State E-reserves court case and the challenges facing public universities in the handling of copyright materials. From one scary topic to the next, Amanda introduced the subject of job interviews conducted at annual conferences and a recent publication by the MLA Executive Director, Rosemary Feal. Skype and other technologies were also addressed as the group reminisced about their experiences on both sides of the interview process. The podcast wrapped up with a shout out to a podcast listener, Allen Riddell and his Novels Project.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 107 - An Easter Basket of Hugs
    (2014-10-07) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    In this episode, regulars Mills Kelly, Dan Cohen, and Stephen Robertson were joined by special guest Sharon Leon, the Director of Public Projects at RRCHNM, along with the digital history fellows, Amanda Reagan and Stephanie Seal. We picked up where we left off last week with a discussion about Twitter and academic freedom after the dismissal of tenured professor Steven Salaita from the University of Illinois. Then we moved to a discussion on the future of Learning Management Systems and their role in academic institutions, as well as praise for the new online journal JSTOR Daily. Our last topic of discussion surrounded the ever ongoing question of whether or not those in the digital humanities should to learn how to code. This conversation was spurred by the new platform Exercism that teaches users to code by encouraging more experienced programmers to provide feedback on a user’s code. We wrapped up the discussion with news from Sharon Leon about upcoming Omeka enhancements, upgrades, and features.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 106 - Back to the Future of Digital Humanities
    (2014-09-15) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    Stephen Robertson hosted this episode and was joined by the whole crew of Dan Cohen, Amanda French, Mills Kelly, and Tom Scheinfeldt, as well as the digital history fellows, Anne Ladyem McDivitt and Alyssa Toby Fahringer, as producers. Important upcoming trends in digital humanities and educational technology were discussed, as well as the ongoing struggles of utilizing technologies on campus and their value to academia. The conversation then moved to the changing nature of Twitter. The group debated the usefulness of Twitter and the purpose it fulfills in an academic environment. Dan also laments his struggles with being the go-to historian for Answers.com.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 105 - Open Libraries and Open Syllabi
    (2014-04-28) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    In the absence of Amanda French, Dan, Tom, Mills and Stephen were assisted by only two Amandas. Tom and Stephen kicked off this podcast with a discussion of new rules for the electronic management of government records and the implications of these new rules for transparency and historical access. We then heard Dan’s thoughts on the Open Syllabus Project, which resulted in a discussion about how educators share or borrow from each others syllabi. One of the questions raised was whether or not syllabus writers can claim copyright over their content, which segued nicely into a discussion of Blackboard’s new open source policies. Our group noted open sourced does not necessarily mean open access. Finally, the group celebrated the first birthday of the Digital Public Library of America and congratulated Dan on its success.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 104 - Social Science History 2: Electric Boogaloo
    (2014-03-26) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    In this episode, Amanda, Stephen, Mills, and guest Joan Troyano were joined by Digital History Fellows Spencer Roberts and Anne Ladyem McDivitt. The first topic of discussion was the announcement of the American Historical Association’s $1.6 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, through which four history departments will restructure their doctoral programs to promote diverse career options for history PhDs. The conversation then moved to the lawsuit between Duke University Press and the Social Science History Association regarding ownership of the Social Science History journal. Finally, on a completely different note, we discussed wearable computing and the implications for digital humanities, which raised lots of questions, excitement, and confusion amongst the participants. To conclude the episode, Joan provided an update from the PressForward project at CHNM, including the upcoming release of their new WordPress plugin.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 103 - Big Data to Big Business
    (2014-03-07) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    In this episode the usual suspects, Mills, Stephen, Amanda, Dan and Tom gathered for yet another lively discussion. The episode began with a discussion on the trend toward opening data as several big players, the Getty, Twitter, Microsoft and the Public Library of Science took steps toward greater accessibility of their resources. The hosts also highlighted the subject of virtual conference attendance, looking at the “dopplebot” conference attendance model. From big changes to a historical look back, the group switched gears to discuss a Pew Report that looks back at 25 years of internet use, broad discussion of changes and how the internet has become an indispensable facet of our lives. Nothing demonstrates that more than the next topic of discussion, the $19 billion dollar purchase of WhatsApp. They were joined by Sharon Leon, director of Public Projects at CHNM for an announcement about two upcoming summer institutes at CHNM for Art Historians and American Historians.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 102 - Digital Campus on 2013 and the Uncertain Future of Amazon's Drones
    (2013-12-18) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    In this year-end roundup/predictions episode of our Digital Campus podcast, Stephen and special guest Sharon Leon jumped in on this year’s cheers and jeers, listing the best and worst stories and events of 2013, including praise for expansion of DH centers and digital collections, as well as critiques of Elsevier‘s recent actions and the impact of the government shutdown on educational institutions. Tom, Mills, Amanda, and Dan then reviewed the successes (there were a few!) and failures (oh, MOOCs…) of their respective predictions for 2013. Once they’d finished assigning grades and debating near-misses, the group invited Sharon and Digital History Fellow Amanda Regan to join in on putting together a set of alternately optimistic and depressing predictions for 2014. Judging from these predictions, this coming year looks good for grad students working on digital dissertations and for those interested in expanding open access, but Amazon’s drones might want to look into bulletproof casings. Special thanks to multimedia whiz Chris Preperato for the plethora of pertinent sound effects in this episode, as well as for ongoing work on the podcast.
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 101 - Fair Use and Access (Shutdown Edition)
    (2013-11-21) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    In this, the first episode of the new Digital Campus century, Mills, Stephen, and Amanda were joined by two new Digital History Fellows, Spencer Roberts and Anne Ladyem McDivitt. Our first story is possibly the most important in Digital Campus history: the Google Books lawsuit has ended (until the appeals). At long last, the court decided that Google’s digitizing project was within fair use law and practice, clearing the way for the digitization work to continue. In addition to the legal significance, it means we can STOP TALKING ABOUT THE GOOGLE BOOKS LAWSUIT. It’s such a shame Dan wasn’t with us to chip in his four cents on the subject. Probably because we needed a new legal topic, we then discussed policies on digital first sale, which will determine how digital content is purchased, distributed, and shared, and speculated about how the first sale policy will affect the practice of buying and reselling textbooks, especially considering recent proposals for open, online textbooks. And in case no one noticed, we reminded listeners that the recent US government shut down did, in fact, make a number of government websites that scholars depend on go dark. One government agency doing some pretty cool stuff these days is the Smithsonian, which has launched a project to digitize and then facilitate the 3D printing of artifacts in their collections. And finally, we expressed our shock and outrage that 90% of students use their mobile devices in class for non-class activities. Can you imagine?
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    Digital Campus Podcast - Episode 100 - The Best and Worst of 2007
    (2013-11-08) Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, /
    For our hundredth anniversary episode, the digital history fellows divided up the 2007 episodes of Digital Campus and picked their favorite bits — listen to the result if you dare, and be transported back to the days when the iPhone was brand new, when Second Life was the Next Big Thing, and when you had to have an email address with a .edu TLD in order to use Facebook. Good times. Many thanks to digital history fellows Ben Hurwitz, Jannelle Legg, Anne McDivitt, Amanda Morgan, Amanda Regan, and Spencer Roberts for choosing the clips, and many many thanks to audiovisual guru Chris Preperato for stitching them together.